you know…Mass Moca…

you know…Mass Moca…



around 1900….wouldn’t it be nice

around 1900….wouldn’t it be nice


lovely place, this North Adams



A building was torn down today.  The old picture is of that intersection 100 years ago.  


Q
Hows your stupid little hospital?
Anonymous
A

closed.

Some law courts have deemed that the community really cannot go without emergency care but in all honesty, we didn’t need a full service hospital.  

There are still a lot of questions: the excessive quickness of the closing (three days), the mismanagement of the hospital and more esoteric questions about our country and its priorities (rural health care is hurtin’)….the bankruptcy proceedings don’t help anything.  No resolution: some are fighting hard (again, it wasn’t that it was just a hospital, it was the biggest employer in a town with gross underemployment and high poverty problems)…

I guess the OB/GYN services are supposed to open up…somewhere…again…but as of this second….you’d better hope there aren’t immediate acute health care needs (on an individual level or otherwise)….


FANTASTIC poster for tonight’s show!  

FANTASTIC poster for tonight’s show!  


ILoveNorthAdams will be at Mike Gordon’s show tonight at Mass Moca

And ILoveNorthAdams is wicked stoked.  Yay!  ILoveNorthAdams was once ILoveSomerville and happened to go to his movie viewing and concert for his movie Inside Out and Colonel Bruce Hampton was there and everything.  Just bragging now. 


…very informative piece about the North Adams Hospital (narh)…

he wrote this piece for the Boston Globe…

THE CLOSING of North Adams Regional Hospital highlights a big challenge facing health care in our state.

After the hospital closes, some of its services will be sustained, but others will be lost. Some physicians will stay, but others will retire or relocate their practices, further worsening access to care.

Over half of the Massachusetts hospitals open when John F. Kennedy was elected president have now closed. Not one that closed was a major teaching hospital. Heavy reliance on teaching hospitals helps explain our state’s extraordinarily high hospital costs. The pattern of closings may be partly responsible for that reliance.

Some might suppose that a functioning free market protects needed and well-run hospitals while closing unneeded and inefficient ones. Sadly, that pattern seldom prevails. Low-cost, efficient hospitals are not likelier to survive. But hospitals in wealthier places, with more patients insured by higher-paying insurers, rarely close. Some call this survival of the fattest.

A broken market is matched by ineffective government. Laws, regulations, and financing to protect all needed hospitals and their patients are weak.

Massachusetts state government should identify the hospitals, emergency departments, and other services that are essential to protecting the health of the public. It should act to ensure that needed institutions and services are paid enough to cover the cost of efficient provision of essential care.

Ultimately, the health care we all get depends heavily on the caregivers we’ve got.

Alan Sager

Boston

The writer is a professor of health policy and management at Boston University School of Public Health.



check out our new health-care-takin’-care-of-needs-mobile! but don’t get attached: it’s a loaner.  


http://www.berkshireeagle.com/ci_25479475/community-health-programs-provides-temporary-relief-narh-patients

check out our new health-care-takin’-care-of-needs-mobile! but don’t get attached: it’s a loaner.  

http://www.berkshireeagle.com/ci_25479475/community-health-programs-provides-temporary-relief-narh-patients


so we had some nasty wind this weekend.  Those are the city’s communication towers.  

so we had some nasty wind this weekend.  Those are the city’s communication towers.  


One of NARH’s Hospice nurses took pictures as he walked out on Friday afternoon….photos by David Blanchette.

One of NARH’s Hospice nurses took pictures as he walked out on Friday afternoon….photos by David Blanchette.


I’ve Been Thinking A Lot about this Hospital Business…

SO…I’ve obviously been thinking about all of this….

I think it was probably inevitable that the hospital was going to close: we don’t need such amenities in such a small (population wise) community with Pittsfield just 20 miles away. In a way, the hospital was just one of the last vestiges of North Adam’s glorious guilded age.

There was a time North Adams was one of THE major hubs of Massachusetts and at a point the third largest city in the state. The population was over double what it is now a century ago. Even when the hospital was moved to its current location the town still had an industrial heartbeat which pumped strongly. Sprague closed in 1985 and it just gutted the town. The population has been in a tailspin ever since then. THANKFULLY there are people like me that can see how amazingly beautiful this place is, and we’re probably all optimistic romantics who can imagine its glory and can gloss over the nasty, ugly truth of trickle down economics. Truth is, North Adams, to spite its advances in the last decade (it REALLY is a truly amazing town with a lot of incredibly cool things going on, I swear) the community’s population doesn’t require a full service hospital. It was all that was left of North Adam’s previous glory days but frankly, it isn’t needed. YES north adams needs some sort of acute care center and a triage for more severe cases but it doesn’t need the HOSPITAL. A lot of poor people are painfully affected by this event and its a pitty to say so but the population will go in decline more. But the truth is for North Adams and rust-belt cities throughout America: its time is done. North Adams has a new future and I’m hopeful that it can shine in the way it does in my romantic mind, but that hospital was a relic holding onto the past: not reality.

Something has to be done because there are services needed….but the full hospital wasn’t. It will be heartbreaking to see people leave town but as my beloved Kurt Vonnegut jr says: so it goes.

(in other words, I guess I’ve come to peace with this?)